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Never Be Afraid to Get Mental Health Support

Never Be Afraid to Get Mental Health Support

March 08, 2022

We regret to share with you the loss of Katie Meyer. The star Stanford University goalkeeper passed last week, and authorities published Thursday, March 3rd that the cause of death was self-inflicted.

In 2019, Meyer helped secure her team’s Women’s College Cup victory by stopping two penalty kicks. She also led the team as Captain during the 2021 season.

We send our deepest condolences to Katie’s loved ones and wish them peace at this time.

It Can Affect Anyone

It’s difficult to witness the deaths of highly driven individuals who otherwise appeared happy, healthy, and successful.

It goes to show how mental health struggles, including depression and suicidal thoughts, can be invisible. They really can affect anyone.

It’s so important to check in with kindness and lend a listening ear to our family members, friends, teammates, and even coworkers, especially those under pressure. 

You never know what someone might be grappling with privately. Whether or not someone is comfortable opening up about their battles, having a compassionate person who’s willing to listen and lend their presence can be a blessing. 

There Are Steps We Can Take

Be aware of the signs of depression in others and how you can help, because depression can be subtle.

Remember that it’s normal to be unsure of how we feel at times. Don’t expect to ‘fix’ someone’s problems, but try to emphasize the importance of seeking help. 

Know how to identify depression in yourself, too. The symptoms of depression can manifest differently depending on the person.

Help Is Available

If you are suffering from anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, substance use, or another mental health condition, or if you’re worried about someone you know, help is closer than you think. 

Don’t be ashamed to reach out to someone you trust. Try to find professional mental health treatment — virtual therapy is gaining popularity and normality among the COVID-19 pandemic, so it is easier than ever to get help.

For immediate support in the meantime, there are numerous 24/7 lines available too:

  • Contact a counselor at the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.
  • You can also reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).
  • Visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org for additional resources for survivors of loss, disasters, and suicide attempts. Spanish-speakers, veterans, youth, deaf and hard of hearing individuals, LGBTQ+, and indiginous people, among us all, are welcome.

Mental health conditions are complicated, but you don’t need to face them on your own. There is strength in seeking help. You matter, no matter what.



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